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ARE YOU READING THE INGREDIENTS IN YOUR SKIN PRODUCTS?

Whether you are men or a woman, whether you only apply lotion on your skin or have a skincare routine, it’s very important that you always read the ingredients of the products you’re buying. Knowing what ingredients are in your skincare products can be crucial knowledge, you’ll have the information you need to make wise choices about what you put in and, on your body’s, largest organ if you know how to read a skincare label.

Technically, advertising phrases like “fragrance-free,” “for sensitive skin,” and “hypoallergenic” are meaningless. In other words, they don’t promise that the product won’t irritate highly sensitive skin or that it won’t contain any irritants. Except for chemicals that make up less than 1% of the formula, which will be placed at the end in any order the manufacturer decides, the ingredients list is always published in order of their concentrations. This is the most crucial thing to grasp about the ingredients list. Nevertheless, given that some components are strong even in little amounts, those mentioned at the end can still exert some of their greatest effects.

Some Ingredients to avoid on skin products:

  1. DEA (diethanolamine), MEA (Monoethanolamine), and TEA (triethanolamine)
  2. SODIUM LAURYL SULFATE (SLS) & SODIUM LAURETH SULFATE (SLES)
  3. PARABENS (Methyl, Butyl, Ethyl, Propyl)
  4. MINERAL OIL
  5. PEG (Polyethylene glycol)
  6. PHTHALATES
  7. PROPYLENE GLYCOL (PG) & BUTYLENE GLYCOL
  8. SYNTHETIC FRAGRANCES

Safe Ingredients in skin products

  1. Hyaluronic acid
  2. Alpha-Hydroxy Acids (AHAs)
  3. Ceramides
  4. Retinol
  5. Argan oil
  6. Vitamin C
  7. Vitamin E
  8. Green tea

SAME WITH YOUR SUNSCREEN FOR OUR SKIN

One of the greatest and simplest ways to maintain the health and beauty of your skin at any age is to wear sunscreen. Regular use of sunscreen aids in avoiding sunburn, skin cancer, and early aging.

The sun protection factor (SPF) measures a sunscreen’s capacity to shield users from a particular UVB wavelength of light. Sunburns and skin cancer are caused by UVB radiation. Other types of UV light include UVC rays, which are blocked by the earth’s atmosphere, and UVA rays. A broad-spectrum sunscreen will shield you from UVB and UVA rays.

Choose a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30 for daily use. When spending time outside, use a product with an SPF of 60 or higher. This greater SPF helps make up for the fact that most people do not use sunscreen as often as they ought to. You’ll need around 1 ounce of sunscreen to cover your face, neck, arms, and legs. One ounce of sunscreen, squeezed into your hand, will cover your palm entirely. You’ll need around a half teaspoon to cover your face and neck.

Chemical and mineral sunscreens are frequently separated into these two types. Ingredients including avobenzone, octisalate, octocrylene, homosalate, and others are found in chemical sunscreens. Mineral sunscreens either use titanium dioxide or zinc oxide. Sunscreens made of chemicals and minerals function similarly (by absorbing UV light and transforming that energy into negligible amounts of heat). Additionally, some UV light is reflected by mineral sunscreens.

Chemical sunscreens may sting some people. Mineral sunscreen can be a better option if you have sensitive skin or frequently experience product reactions. Mineral sunscreens have the drawback of frequently leaving a visible white cast, especially on the skin of color.

Otherwise, it’s a matter of preference. The sunblock that you use every day is the best.

At Green School Green Future, we seek to inform people. Remember that while essential, sunscreen is not sufficient on its own. A comprehensive sun protection plan includes seeking out shade whenever possible, donning sun-safe clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and UV-blocking eyewear. And don’t forget to apply sunscreen in winter and as importantly indoors.

Check our shop for our Organic line of products from  Annmarie Skin Care

Blog Image Credit: Unsplash by Enecta

Blog Image Credit:  Pexels.com – Sora Shimazaki – 5938242jpg

   Written by Ana Navarro

Ana Pic for Blog pexels-sora-shimazaki-5938242

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